The Coleambally Food and Farm Festival

November 23, 2016

The Coleambally Food and Farm Festival

On the penultimate weekend of October we attended the Coleambally Food and Farm Festival , known around these parts as Taste Coly. This small town festival features food, drink, art exhibits and workshops of many kinds and really is a celebration of everything local. Something that we here at TRBC are very proud to showcase and extremely happy to be a part of!

Although the event started at a relatively normal time we had to be up before the birds at
3am here in Tumut in order to make the drive and get there by 7:30am to set up our bar and have it ready for the closure of the street. This was the maiden journey for our van (above, and yet to be named) and she performed excellently, getting us there without a hitch! The van also worked fantastically once we arrived at the event. We got everything plugged in and she purred smoothly for the whole time we were there; just like we’d dreamed she would've!

Once we got to Coleambally the guys there were amazing to us. Coleambally is a small country town and we definitely got that small country friendly feel and welcome whilst we were there with everyone being exceptionally friendly and helpful; we even had a guy to help us back up the van into our spot (something we’ve never come across before). The local pub, which would have lost out on a bit of business because of our presence, were 100% supportive of our cause. they hooked us up to their power supply, lent us some tools we needed for a small unforeseen situation and even purchased one of our kegs. So if you were at Taste Coly and you’re still craving a Tumut brew, then head over to the Brolga Hotel before their keg kicks!

As for the festival, it was a great success for us. The weather was beautiful, we managed to shift a good few cases of beer and we had a lot of positive feedback from the constant stream of people passing through who seemed to really enjoy our product; something that always goes down well with us!

We packed up and left by around 3pm in order to make the 300 plus kilometre journey back to our home of Tumut. On the way back the van performed even better due to the fact that it was now considerably lighter; and this all bodes well for some more ambitious trips we are planning for the future. For that day though we were home with everything sorted out by 8pm and ready to hit the bed before getting up to work again. These festival things are long, labour intensive days but seeing the smiles put on face and hearing all the positive feedback makes every single second worth it. Here’s to next year, Cheers!

Van Crowd






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